The Ishbane Conspiracy (review)

Leave a comment

The Ishbane ConspiracyThe Ishbane Conspiracy by Angela Alcorn

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

“Sometimes the best way to see a thing is to look at its opposite,” says Randy Alcorn, quoting A.W. Tozer in his “Note to Readers.” The opposite is something of which we get large chunks in The Ishbane Conspiracy—a novel by Alcorn and his daughters Angela and Karina.

In the story (which was first released in 2001) we follow teenage characters Jillian, Brittany, Rob, and Ian for a year. Jillian’s younger brother Daniel and her mother Diane Fletcher also play main parts in the story. The opposite view comes via letters between demon character Ishbane and his understudy Foulgrin.

The letters give us an inside-out commentary on all that’s happening in the teens’ lives. These foul spirits gloat over successes like getting the “vermin” to consult the ouija board and tarot cards, ignore their parents, and get wasted on drugs and alcohol. But they wring their hands in dismay when the kids clean up their lives, pray, and witness to their friends about Jesus and His power to change them.

During the year, these kids face the gamut of modern teen temptation. They deal with the lure of the occult, drugs, alcohol and the partying lifestyle, the fallout of being bullied and teased, eating disorders, premarital sex, pregnancy, peer pressure, the communication chasm between teens and their parents, and more.

I gave this book four stars (not five) because I did find the characters somewhat one-dimensional, the plot contrived, and some of the demonic diatribes long and preachy. But I would still say The Ishbane Conspiracy is a worthwhile read.

Here are some choice demonic bits I highlighted:

“Keep their eyes closed to the spiritual realm. How? Simply by keeping them busy orbiting around themselves” – Kindle Location 1711.

“The humans’ minds are tainted because they have such vested interests in disbelief. If they don’t have a creator, that means they don’t have a Judge. How convenient” – KL 2393.

“She doesn’t understand prayer isn’t preparation for battle, it is the battle” – KL 5397.

Though The Ishbane Conspiracy is no Screwtape Letters (C.S. Lewis) I would say it does have the potential to impact modern youth. Novelist James Scott Bell says, in his endorsement of the book: “I would love to see The Ishbane Conspiracy in the hands of every high school and college student in America” – KL 17.

This tale did get me thinking too and asking what in my life would make an Ishbane or a Foulgrin groan—or cheer?

I received The Ishbane Conspiracy as a gift from the publisher for the purpose of writing a review.

View all my reviews

An Insider’s Guide to Spiritual Warfare (review)

2 Comments

An Insider's Guide to Spiritual Warfare: 20 Battle Tested Strategies from Behind Enemy LinesAn Insider’s Guide to Spiritual Warfare: 20 Battle Tested Strategies from Behind Enemy Lines by Kristine McGuire

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

When, one day, a man asked Kristine McGuire, “What is spiritual warfare?” she was surprised. McGuire, who describes herself as aware of spiritual things since childhood, had never realized people might not be attuned to the spiritual dimension and unaware of the battles taking place in that realm. Her difficulty in coming up with a good answer for her questioner challenged her to study spiritual warfare. An Insider’s Guide to Spiritual Warfare is the result.

The book consists of five sections that contain a total of thirty chapters. Within them she discusses spiritual warfare from many angles. These include defining what it is (Chapter 1 of Part 1 “Life in the Spiritual War Zone”); examining the “Weapons of War” (Part 2, subjects include “The Belt of Truth,” “The Breastplate of Righteousness” etc); naming “Common Battlefields” (Part 3, topics include “Suffering,” “Worry and Fear,” and “Lust”); exposing the enemy’s tools in “When Supernatural Meets Natural” (Part 4, topics of pagan culture, familiar spirits, ghosts and more); and, finally, challenging us: “Take Back Your Ground” (Part 5, subjects include overcoming war-weariness and praying the Bible).

Sprinkled as text boxes within the chapters are the 30 Battle-tested Strategies promised in the subtitle.

Example: “Strategy Point #1: As God’s adopted child, you have the right to call out ‘Abba Father!’” – p. 26.

At the back of every chapter is a “Your turn to Reflect” segment—five questions that invite the reader to interact with and apply what they have just read. Some chapters also tag on a relevant Scripture passage and a “Take Action” section.

The book ends with a bibliography of sources for supplementary reading and a topical index.

I found the book logical in idea development and easy to understand. McGuire’s voice is passionate and compassionate as she speaks out of conviction and personal experience. Here, for example in the chapter “The Subtle Influence of a Pagan Culture,” she talks about how even Christian culture has, through avoidance, begun to accept the occult:

“Although some Christian apologists and teachers have been warning the Church of the influence of mysticism and the occult in the Church for years, such warnings have often fallen on deaf ears. Many say there is no such thing as paranormal activity, witchcraft, divination or spirit communication, often placing all occult activities into the category of fanciful tales or outright trickery.

“This is how occultism is gaining, and has gained, a foothold in many Christian lives. We have a community of believers with limited knowledge of the Bible. They have questions. When they do go to their pastors seeking answers, or with stories of paranormal experiences, they are rebuffed” – p. 159.

Section four, where McGuire tells stories about her own involvement in the occult helps us see the pathway in and out of occultic deception. Her voice of experience in these matters sets this book apart from other books about spiritual warfare.

At this time when paranormal subjects are getting lots of book, internet, and TV attention, we really need the kind of testimony and teaching that McGuire gives in her book. It is an excellent resource for Christians old and new. For the experienced believer it is a good review of spiritual warfare basics. For the new Christian it is for a clear explanation of what spiritual warfare is, and how and why we need to be involved. For all it is a challenge to holy living in every part of life.

I received An Insider’s Guide to Spiritual Warfare as a gift from the publisher, Chosen Books, for the purpose of writing a review.

View all my reviews

Deliver Us From Evil (review)

Leave a comment

Deliver Us from Evil: A Pastor's Reluctant Encounters with the Powers of DarknessDeliver Us from Evil: A Pastor’s Reluctant Encounters with the Powers of Darkness by Don Basham

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

In Deliver Us From Evil Don Basham tells the story of his deliverance ministry. The mindset Basham started out with would never have predicted such a career. He was irritated when a fellow minister suggested the problems he was encountering in his Pennsylvania church might have their source in:

“…a spiritual adversary. An ‘enemy in high places.’ The Bible calls him Satan…”

Basham’s reaction:

It was an effort to keep my face straight. Surely the man didn’t literally … ‘That’s the trouble with biblical literalists,’ I fumed as I roared away. A pat answer for everything so we’re saved the discomfort of thinking. The man belonged in the Middle Ages! Satan indeed! (Kindle Location 327).

The book goes on to tell how God opened his eyes to demonic activity around him and drew him into a line of work that consumed years of his life. His stories illustrate principles of how to recognize demonic oppression, how he took Jesus as his example when dealing with the demon spirits, and things he learned from his failures as well as his successes. He also addresses subjects like how demons get in, the conditions necessary for deliverance, and how to keep one’s life free from their return once the unclean spirits have been exorcised. He illustrates every teaching point with examples from his years of experience.

Basham is a gifted storyteller and this was a fascinating read. Though the book was first published in 1972, it’s as relevant today as ever for professionals (ministers, counselors) and lay people alike.

I received Deliver Us From Evil as a gift from the publisher, Chosen Books, for the purpose of writing a review. One star off for the difficulty I had reading the NetGalley Kindle review copy, where about a quarter of the sentences contained no spaces between words.

View all my reviews